20
Apr

Everything you need to know about how blue light damages your skin

Everything You Need To Know About How Blue Light Damages Your Skin

Not only your eyes, your smartphone affects your skin too — but how much? Find out here

If you feel digital detox is the way out, then allow us to tell you that it is not a fool-proof solution. With another lockdown making its way into our lives, our screen time is only likely to increase

Blue Light Damage Your Skin

Blue light is a new phenomenon with new technology that we are exposed to much frequently. This has different side effects like increased photosensitivity.

Blue light penetrates deeper into the skin as compared to UVA/UVB light

But how harmful is it? Blue light penetrates deeper into the skin as compared to UVA/UVB light, thus it can be more active in inducing pigmentation as compared to UVA/UVB light.

But there is more to its effects. While aging is a natural process, overexposure to blue light can expedite the process and also lead to photoaging, which is caused by exposure to light or UVA/UVB radiations. In fact, exposing your skin to three hours of blue light can cause as much damage as one hour of sun exposure, without sun protection. 

Not only that, but blue light also causes oxidative damage which occurs when the skin is triggered by free radicals, or unstable oxygen molecules damaging healthy skin cells.

If you feel digital detox is the way out, then allow us to tell you it is not a fool-proof solution. With another lockdown making its way into our lives, our screen time is only likely to increase. So what works best for the skin?
Dr. Geeta Grewal, cosmetic surgeon and wellness expert, 9 Muses wellness clinic said: “Before you tweak your skincare regime, it’s important to cover your phones and computers with a blue light shield. Not only, that you can easily switch to dark/night mode and tone down the brightness too.”

Another way can be to include topical antioxidants in the form of skincare. Topical antioxidants such as sunscreens with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide can work best against blue light.

Thus, if you are sincerely applying your sunscreen even when you are at home, you are doing the first bit towards protecting the skin.

For those with dry skin, Dr. Grewal suggested using moisturizers rich in hyaluronic acid, glycerin, shea butter and ceramides. “All of this coupled with drinking water helps keep your barrier intact and in turn fight the HEV damage,” she said.

While topical treatments are necessary. Some ingredients can be included as an antioxidant-rich diet, as they protect your skin from within. It would be good to include antioxidant-rich foods such as pomegranate, grape seed, gogi fruit, rose, green tea, vitamin E or vitamin B3 (niacinamide).